Political Blues

I’ve seen statuses in my Facebook feed this week from people in the blues community aimed at musicians, telling them not to speak about politics because it could alienate their fans. But…it’s blues. It’s inherently tied to political and social issues, and many songs are explicitly political. Here are just a few examples.

1937: Leadbelly- The Bourgeois Blues

1939: Unidentified Prisoners in Florida’s Raiford Penitentiary- We Don’t Have No Pay Day Here

1940 & 1941: Josh White’s albums Chain Gang and Southern Exposure: An Album of Jim Crow Blues are both political. Here’s Uncle Sam Says.

1943: Buster Brown- War Song

1946: Big Bill Broonzy wrote this tune, and his version of it was released in the 1950s- Black, Brown, and White

1962: Louisiana Red- Ride On Red, Ride On

1965: J.B. Lenoir has political songs for days. Here’s Alabama Blues.

1970: Floyd Jones performs Stockyard Blues, originally recorded in 1948.

1996, 2002: versions of Tojo Told Hitler by CeDell Davis and RL Burnside (warning: swears in the RL version)

Modern blues artists Michael Hill and Eric Bibb both have a number of songs about contemporary political and social issues.

And here’s a little 1973 soul gem from The Honeydrippers.
And if you want more radical political soul music, look into Swamp Dogg.

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